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Event title Date Details
Geoffrey Dabb ‘Nine Interesting Canberra Birds’ Thursday, 11 July 2019 - 12:30pm

Geoffrey, a lifelong birdwatcher, will present an illustrative talk, that will concentrate on nine species of birds that have a particular connection with Canberra.  Three of the birds are residents, three are migrants, and three come and go, to some extent, throughout the year.  There are different views on what birds are migrants and what are notable

Dr Ben Walcott ‘Garden Design with Native Plants’ Thursday, 18 July 2019 - 12:30pm

Ben will talk about garden design using native plants including some well-known native gardens.

Brendan Lepschi ‘Your Time Would Be Better Spent Digging Holes – Taxonomy, Plant Names and Why Nothing Ever Stays the Same’ Thursday, 25 July 2019 - 12:30pm

Brendan, Curator at the Australian National Herbarium, will discuss some of the reasons plant names change and outline the principles of botanical nomenclature and the rules governing it, using members of the iconic Australian family Goodeniaceae as an example.

Guided Walk - Mosses, Lichens, Fungi and Plants in the Days of Dinosaurs Sunday, 28 July 2019 - 10:00am to 11:00am

About 50  million years ago,  Australia was part of Gondwana, a supercontinent in the southern hemisphere.  Dinosaurs roamed this great landmass.  Join Volunteer Guide Linda Beveridge on this one hour guided walk through the ANBG discovering the plants that are similar to those the dinosaurs would have been familiar with.

Please note that this walk is also open to the general public and that numbers are limited.

Dr Jane Roberts ‘Value of Wetlands and Swamps’ Thursday, 1 August 2019 - 12:30pm

Jane, a wetland ecologist, will talk about wetlands, and how they are currently of scientific interest for their role in carbon storage, but that has not always been how they have been valued.  An historical perspective of wetland values and their changes say more about human society than about wetlands.

Guided Walk - Mosses, Lichens, Fungi and Plants in the Days of Dinosaurs Sunday, 4 August 2019 - 10:00am to 11:00am

About 50  million years ago,  Australia was part of Gondwana, a supercontinent in the southern hemisphere.  Dinosaurs roamed this great landmass.  Join Volunteer Guide Linda Beveridge on this one hour guided walk through the ANBG discovering the plants that are similar to those the dinosaurs would have been familiar with.

Please note that this walk is also open to the general public and that numbers are limited.

Damian Wrigley ‘Australian Seed Bank Partnership’ Thursday, 8 August 2019 - 12:30pm

Damian, from the Australian Seed Bank Partnership (ASBP), will outline how the ASBP is contributing to global conservation efforts and will give an update on the Seed Science Forum to be held at the ANBG in 2020.

Glenn Cocking ‘Moths and Bushblitzes’ Thursday, 15 August 2019 - 12:30pm

Glenn, a volunteer curator at the Australian National Insect Collection, will discuss the moth fauna of Black Mountain in the context of some general observations about moths, and how to understand the families present in the ACT, and tell some stories about an eclectic selection of particular species from wider afield.

Dr Laura Rayner ‘Parrot Central for a Bird on the Edge’ Thursday, 22 August 2019 - 12:30pm

Laura, a conservation ecologist, will bring us up-to-date on her research on Superb Parrots – a superb bird pushed to the very edge of its natural range by climate change and land clearing.  It is now a race against time to determine what pressures the parrot is facing and what needs to be done to secure its future.

Anke Maria Hoefer ‘Frogwatch Successfully Marrying Citizen Science and Community Engagement Since 2002.’ Thursday, 29 August 2019 - 12:30pm

Anke Maria, from the ACT and Regional Frogwatch Program, will introduce you to the program that engages hundreds of volunteers each year. The data collected feeds into a wide range of frog projects, including frog census, climate change investigations and frog habitat studies. 

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